Night of Heritage Light

To celebrate 2015 being the UNESCO International Year of Light, the Society of Light and Lighting (SLL) undertook an ambitious project to “light-map” the UK and Ireland by illuminating a number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites for one night only, The Night of Heritage Light (NoHL).

Jurassic Coast. Credit: Mike Massaro.

Jurassic Coast. Credit: Mike Massaro.

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IYL 2015 Best Practice Exchange Event organized by the German Physical Society

On 9 October 2015 the German Physical Society (DPG) organized a meeting between National Node representatives of the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies 2015 (IYL 2015) at the Magnus Haus in Berlin, Germany. The focus of the meeting was to exchange best practices examples of IYL 2015 activities and events, resulting sustainable development and possible further cooperative actions for the future.

Participants of the event in front of the Magnus Haus in Berlin, Germany. Credit: DPG.

Participants of the event in front of the Magnus Haus in Berlin, Germany. Credit: DPG.

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Artistic activities promoting IYL 2015 to reach out wider crowds

The countdown has already started: we are on the final 100 days of the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL 2015). So far, the IYL 2015 has already reached over a hundred countries and millions of people worldwide with activities taking place on all continents.

Light is pervasive and inspiring and many people around the world has channeled their inspiration to promote IYL 2015 in many artistic ways to reach out wider crowds.

The Light Painting World Alliance (LPWA) contributed to a community art experience by using light to paint the IYL 2015 logo on Plaza de la Gesta in Oviedo, Spain. Credit: LPWA.

The Light Painting World Alliance (LPWA) contributed to a community art experience by using light to paint the IYL 2015 logo on Plaza de la Gesta in Oviedo, Spain. Credit: LPWA.

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The Increased Necessity for Natural Light in Urban Architecture

In 2014, there were an estimated 230+ high-rise building set to be erected in London, many of them residential. As much as that benefits the skyline, businesses and future tenants, it can be detrimental in terms of natural light. While such towering buildings cast perpetual shadow on the streets below, it can also be tenants who suffer from a lack of daylight.

As the demand for such buildings shows no sign of dying down, the burden of providing light is heavy on the shoulders of architects. It’s an accepted fact that natural light improves happiness and wellbeing. In fact a lack of it can result in Sick Building Syndrome (symptoms including fatigue, nausea and skin irritation). Considerate planning is therefore an increasing necessity.

A primitive example of a light well in a residential space. Credit: Light well image from Flickr (Creative Commons) by Carsten ten Brink.

A primitive example of a light well in a residential space. Credit: Light well image from Flickr (Creative Commons) by Carsten ten Brink.

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